Jan 22
Book Review: Jennifer Worth’s Call the Midwife

Book Review: Jennifer Worth’s Call the Midwife

Call the Midwife first came to my attention when I heard PBS was going to air the BBC series. I wasn’t sure if I’d be interested in a show about midwives in the 1950’s and close friends kept raving about it. I didn’t get around to watching the adaptation until New Year’s Eve and was quite surprised at how much I fell in love with the show. Shortly afterwards I borrowed the book from my local library branch. Jennifer Worth is an engaging storyteller. She decided to write about her experiences in response to an article in the Royal College of Midwives Journal by Terri Coates regarding the underrepresentation of midwives in literature. Coates urged, “a midwife somewhere to do for midwifery what James Herriot did for vets.” Worth took… Read more »

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Jan 21

Priechenfried’s The Game of Chess

I’m starting a new feature here at Literary, etc. Each week we’ll feature a painting or an artist. It gives us the opportunity to discuss a painting and of course admire the pretty! Alois Heinrich Priechenfried (1867 – 1953) – The Game of Chess Oil on canvas

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Jan 19
Edgar Allan Poe’s Annabel Lee

Edgar Allan Poe’s Annabel Lee

Today is Edgar Allan Poe’s birthday and I decided to share my favorite Poe poem: Annabel Lee. What’s your favorite Poe work? Annabel Lee It was many and many a year ago, In a kingdom by the sea, That a maiden there lived whom you may know By the name of ANNABEL LEE; And this maiden she lived with no other thought Than to love and be loved by me. I was a child and she was a child, In this kingdom by the sea; But we loved with a love that was more than love- I and my Annabel Lee; With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven Coveted her and me. And this was the reason that, long ago, In this kingdom by the sea, A wind… Read more »

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Jan 19
Book Review: Vicki Hopkins’ Dark Persuasion

Book Review: Vicki Hopkins’ Dark Persuasion

I’ve stated before in a previous review how I’m not a big fan of authors who are upfront and state the history of central characters and how they are connected. This approach can be either hit or miss, but in the case of Dark Persuasion, Vicki Hopkins does an amazing job setting up the plot and it defiantly is needed to understand the particular actions of certain characters. Charlotte Grey was a child when an accident left her blind and she’s surprised her aristocratic neighbors are interested in being her sponsors and hold a ball in her honor. At the ball she meets two brothers, Patrick and Rupert, who are different as night and day. Both will battle for her hand, but which brother will win her heart and can… Read more »

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Jan 18
Book Review: Mark Capell’s Vows to Kill

Book Review: Mark Capell’s Vows to Kill

When Detective Inspector Lee Eyre receives an email threatening to kill him on his wedding day, he is on the hunt to find the culprit. At first he believes it might an interoffice joke, but then he quickly realizes if it’s not a joke, who sent it? Should he tell his wife-to-be, Lucy, or keep quiet as he investigates? There’s one question we, as readers, will find ourselves asking: Is Lee Eyre guilty? There’s mention of an incident gone wrong and Eyre’s inability to move on from it. Mark Capell does an excellent job going over the details of “Southampton” (the place where the incident occurs). If Eyre is guilty, what is he guilty of? What I really enjoyed is how Capell reveals bits of information and it’s up to… Read more »

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Jan 17
Book Review: Shelly Crane’s Significance

Book Review: Shelly Crane’s Significance

Significance is the first book in Shelly Crane’s Significance series. There are four books total with a companion book. In this case, it is necessary to read the first book in the series and work your way down the list. I should also note there’s a film version of the series coming to a screen near you. Ultimately what doesn’t work for me is how quickly Maggie and Caleb fall in love. Maggie even questioned her constant need for him and Caleb himself said to her that he wouldn’t push himself on her. He doesn’t, and I realize situations forced them be in each other’s company, but it wasn’t believable to me. Also the whole imprint concept was a bit rushed and not thoroughly explained. I don’t know if it’s… Read more »

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Jan 16

The Shape of Archetypal Stories

Do formulas exist in the stories we read? Kurt Vonnegut believed so and he suggests these formulas help an author build a story and help an audience identify with a story or helps them analyze it. Maya Eilam created this interesting infographic regarding Vonnegut’s theories about archetypal stories. In this short lecture, Vonnegut explains his theory. As a reader or author do you agree with his assessment?

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Jan 14
Cover Reveal: Amy Maurer Jones’ Vampire Valentine

Cover Reveal: Amy Maurer Jones’ Vampire Valentine

Amy Maurer Jones, author of Wildflower and The Soul Quest Trilogy, is planning to release something new on or near Valentine’s Day! After reading the synopsis, I can’t wait because it does sound like a fun read. * * * Synopsis How is it that vampires, werewolves and witches always manage to become glamorized in Hollywood? They are forever portrayed as the overwhelmingly gorgeous, record-breaking athletic types with off-the-chart SAT scores! This is such a load of crap. Let’s be honest with ourselves for a minute. It’s never easy being different, even under normal circumstances. Now, factor in the reality that your DNA is something far from human and imagine yourself wandering the halls of an ordinary mortal high school. You still think this would be cool, right? Well, you… Read more »

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Jan 13
Book Review: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl

Book Review: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl

Gone Girl has been sitting in my to be read pile for awhile now and even though I’m late to the party, I have finally arrived. I’ve never read Gillian Flynn before and even though I’ve seen her books around, nothing really prompted me to read anything of hers before. I kept seeing people rave about her latest and I finally decided to see for myself. I can’t believe I waited this long. What I can say about Gone Girl without spoiling it? Nick Dunne isn’t going to win the husband of the year award and when his wife, Amy, goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary, questions soon arise about his true character. Nick himself is hiding a few secrets and he maintains his innocence regarding his… Read more »

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Jan 12

Bookish Dress Up & My Book Crack

Our first mini challenge is hosted by Nyx Book Reviews: Bookish Dress Up. The challenge is: I would love to know which character you would dress differently, and how! If I had to pick any character to dress up, I’d say Susan from Chelsea Cain’s Archie Sheridan / Gretchen Lowell series. Susan is often described as wearing nothing but jeans, t-shirts (such has her beloved The Pixies shirt), and combat boots. Susan in part dresses the way she does because she has a hippie mother. I’d like to see her wear more dresses and take pride in her looks, but not as a way to impress Archie. Susan also sports a different hair color in a each book, but I think if it were up to me, I’d have Susan… Read more »

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Jan 10
Book Spine Poem

Book Spine Poem

Escape Through the Pages is hosting this mini challenge for Bout of Books and here is my entry! It makes no sense, but this was fun. Shadow of Night A Keeper of Words Effortless, Thoughtless A Point of No Retreat The Siren Calls Sweetheart Kill You Twice It’s The Last Duel A Death in the Small Hours

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Jan 09

Favorite Victorian Era Novels

These are a few of my favorite Victorian era novels. All the novels listed were published during the period from 1837-1901. It’s not a complete list, but these I love to reread. What are your favorites? Title:Vanity Fair Author: William Makepeace Thackeray Year: 1847 A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847–48, satirizing society in early 19th-century Britain. The book’s title comes from John Bunyan’s allegorical story The Pilgrim’s Progress, first published in 1678 and still widely read at the time of Thackeray’s novel. Vanity fair refers to a stop along the pilgrim’s progress: a never-ending fair held in a town called Vanity, which is meant to represent man’s sinful attachment to worldly things. Title: Anna Karenina Author: Leo Tolstoy Year: 1877… Read more »

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