Posts Tagged: England

Jul 31
Book Review: Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry

Book Review: Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry

Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry is the sixth book in his Baker and Llewlyn series. If you haven’t read any of the books in the series, it’s not necessary to do so in order to enjoy Fatal Enquiry. Thomas does a good job minimizing history from other books and at no point do you feel lost reading a book in an already established series. We have good character development. Cyrus Baker is a gentleman enquiry agent and he’s a bit quirky. We don’t get to fully know him, but it’s easy to see that he’s not an easy man to work for. His assistant is Thomas Llewlyn who was once in jail for a crime and now devotes his time assisting Baker on cases. I had trouble with Llewlyn and wasn’t… Read more »

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Jan 31
Book Review: Marci Jefferson’s Girl on the Golden Coin

Book Review: Marci Jefferson’s Girl on the Golden Coin

If one word could be used to describe Marci Jefferson Girl on the Golden Coin, it would be: captivating. It’s beautiful, lush, and breathtaking. I didn’t want it to end! Not many people may know the story of Frances Stuart, but no doubt you’ve seen the image of Britannia on British currency. Dressed in roman robes, she’s seated holding a trident while wearing a Corinthian helmet and beside her is a shield depicting the unification of Scotland and England. In 1672, Frances served as the model for Britannia and since then has been featured on medals and coins. She’s since been retired, but in 2006 appeared on the fifty pence. Right in front of me as I write this review is that fifty pence though I’m lucky to have several… Read more »

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Dec 05
25 Days of Book Boyfriends: Nicholas Brisbane + Giveaway

25 Days of Book Boyfriends: Nicholas Brisbane + Giveaway

Yay! I’m really excited to be part of the 25 Days of Book Boyfriends hosted by Lovin’ los libros, Readers Live a 1000 Lives, and Starbucks & Books Obsession. As several of you know, I have way too many fictional boyfriends and today I’m going to share with you someone I met over the summer. See, I’d seen him mentioned a few times, but I didn’t have the courage to meet him until I was called for jury duty. I complained and when I found out you could spend your free time in the waiting room doing what you wanted, I knew what I was going to do: I was going to finally crack open the first book in the Lady Julia Grey series. I was memorized from the moment… Read more »

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Nov 20
Book Review: Carolly Erickson’s The Spanish Queen

Book Review: Carolly Erickson’s The Spanish Queen

Carolly Erickson’s The Spanish Queen is a fictionalized autobiography of Catherine of Aragon. Erickson recreates Catherine’s departure from Spain to England and we spend our time in Tudor court. As a sixteen year old, Catherine of Aragon makes the journey from Spain to England but prior to her departure, Queen Isabella asks her to wear her wedding dress. Everyone around her says it will bring bad luck, but Catherine complies. Shortly afterwards, Catherine is told she’s cursed after a series of events prevent her departure from Spain. She decides to continue with her travel plans and arrives in England where she’ll marry Henry VII’s son, Arthur. Her marriage to Arthur doesn’t last long and finds herself developing a friendship with Henry VIII. She waits quietly in the wings unsure of… Read more »

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Oct 05
One Liners: Charles Finch’s A Beautiful Blue Death

One Liners: Charles Finch’s A Beautiful Blue Death

One Liners is a weekly feature where we look at a novel’s first line as if it were a pick up line. We’ve all heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” The first line in a book is equally important as the last since it sets the tone and often will either make an impression or not. Let’s face it, it’s a little like dating. Will that guy with the cheesy pick up line score a number or not? So, I began to think…if the first line in a book was a pick up line, would you give it your number, agree to a date, let it buy you a drink, or do you walk away? Today’s book is Charles Finch’s A Beautiful… Read more »

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Sep 14
One Liners: Deanna Raybourn’s Silent in the Grave

One Liners: Deanna Raybourn’s Silent in the Grave

One Liners is a weekly feature where we look at a novel’s first line as if it were a pick up line. We’ve all heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” The first line in a book is equally important as the last since it sets the tone and often will either make an impression or not. Let’s face it, it’s a little like dating. Will that guy with the cheesy pick up line score a number or not? So, I began to think…if the first line in a book was a pick up line, would you give it your number, agree to a date, let it buy you a drink, or do you walk away? The first book to be featured is… Read more »

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Jul 23
Book Review: C.J. Daugherty’s Night School

Book Review: C.J. Daugherty’s Night School

Let me start off by saying, looking at the cover of C.J. Daugherty’s Night School, what are your first initial thoughts? It looks spooky with paranormal undertones. Even the synopsis hints at something dark and mysterious but there’s nothing paranormal about the book. I don’t consider this a spoiler, but others might. I apologize in advance if you think it is one. Sixteen year old Allie Sheridan has been on a road of destruction since her brother, Christopher disappeared. She’s constantly getting into trouble and failing her classes. Her latest exploit involves breaking into her current school and when she gets arrested, her parents have had enough and arrange to send her to Cimmeria Academy. Allie has never heard of the school and wonders what type of institution would accept… Read more »

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Apr 15
Book Review: Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman

Book Review: Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman

I’m a fan of Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz) and auto-buy her books. I admit I lost interest in her Arcane series once we reached the conclusion of how Jones & Jones agency came together and she started expanding the Arcane series to include outside associates. I wanted to prep for this review by reading the last 3 books I missed, but decided it would be best to read from a new reader’s perspective without any previous knowledge as most new readers. Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman is the second book in her Ladies of Lantern Street series. If you haven’t read the first book, Crystal Gardens, it’s not necessary to do so. Quick does a good job giving you an overview of what exactly the agency Flint &… Read more »

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Apr 07
Book Review: Lauren Willig’s The Ashford Affair

Book Review: Lauren Willig’s The Ashford Affair

If you’re familiar with Lauren Willig’s books, then you know she often combines narratives from the past with the present. The Ashford Affair isn’t any different and incorporates the narratives of both Clementine (in the present) and Addie’s (the past). This is Addie’s story, but in many ways, it’s also Clementine’s. Clementine is on journey to realize what truly matters in life. Clementine Evans arrives late to her grandmother’s birthday celebration and is surprised when her grandmother calls her Bea. She asks her mother about Bea, but doesn’t get a direct answer. In fact, Clementine asks around and slowly a family secret is unearthed. Bea was a cousin of Granny Addie and through a series of flashbacks we’re told Addie’s story. Addie comes to live with the Earl of Ashford… Read more »

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Feb 28
Book Review: Elizabeth Hoyt’s Lord of Darkness

Book Review: Elizabeth Hoyt’s Lord of Darkness

Elizabeth Hoyt’s Lord of Darkness is the fifth book in her Maiden Lane series. For those not familiar with this particular series, Lord of Darkness can be read as a standalone if you don’t mind the back-story she fills in. Otherwise I recommend starting with the first book, Wicked Intentions. Godric St. John still grieves for the loss of his wife Clara. He decides to live the rest of his life as a widower and devoted to her memory; however, that changes when Griffin Reading blackmails him into marrying his sister Margaret. Margaret reluctantly agrees to the marriage when she finds out her fiancé has been murdered and fears what her family might do when they find out she’s expecting a child. Knowing Margaret will never want a real marriage… Read more »

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Jan 22
Book Review: Jennifer Worth’s Call the Midwife

Book Review: Jennifer Worth’s Call the Midwife

Call the Midwife first came to my attention when I heard PBS was going to air the BBC series. I wasn’t sure if I’d be interested in a show about midwives in the 1950’s and close friends kept raving about it. I didn’t get around to watching the adaptation until New Year’s Eve and was quite surprised at how much I fell in love with the show. Shortly afterwards I borrowed the book from my local library branch. Jennifer Worth is an engaging storyteller. She decided to write about her experiences in response to an article in the Royal College of Midwives Journal by Terri Coates regarding the underrepresentation of midwives in literature. Coates urged, “a midwife somewhere to do for midwifery what James Herriot did for vets.” Worth took… Read more »

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Nov 20
Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

A Death in the Small Hours is the sixth installment of the Lenox mystery series and his best one to date. If you’ve never read the Lenox series, don’t fret as each of his books can be read as a standalone. Although Finch isn’t one of those writers to drown you in a character’s back story, I do believe a reader new to the series will fail to appreciate the personal history of his characters. As the series progresses, the Lenox characters grow and I’m afraid a reader will miss key elements that would help further understand a character’s way of thinking or reaction to a situation. Therefore, I do recommend you start at the beginning with A Beautiful Blue Death and work your down the list, but it’s not… Read more »

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