Posts Tagged: literary

Mar 03
Book Review: Charles Finch’s The Last Enchantments

Book Review: Charles Finch’s The Last Enchantments

There’s always a bit of anxiety when a favorite author departs from their established genre and dabbles in a new one. When I heard about Charles Finch’s The Last Enchantments, I didn’t have those feelings because I knew he would take care of me. That being said, this is the hardest review I’ve had to write as a blogger and it’s not because I’m a fan of his, but rather I don’t know what to say other than to use shouty capitals: GO BUY THIS BOOK AND READ IT NOOOOW! After John Kerry loses the 2004 presidential election, William Baker decides to pursue a postgraduate degree in literature at Oxford University. Leaving behind political dreams he soon finds himself immersed in academic life and contemplating his future. Will isn’t prepared… Read more »

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Feb 03
Excerpt: The Taste of Apple Seeds by Katharina Hagena

Excerpt: The Taste of Apple Seeds by Katharina Hagena

As part of The Taste of Apple Seeds blog tour, I have an exclusive excerpt to share! I really enjoyed this book and if you’re a fan of magical realism this is one book you want to read! Synopsis: An international bestseller, The Taste of Apple Seeds is a story of love and loss that will captivate your heart. When Iris unexpectedly inherits her grandmother’s house in the country, she also inherits the painful memories that live there. Iris gives herself a one-week stay at the old house, after which she’ll make a decision: keep it, or sell it. The choice is not so simple, though, for her grandmother’s cottage is an enchanting place where currant jam tastes of tears, sparks fly from fingertips, love’s embrace makes apple trees blossom,… Read more »

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Dec 02
Blog Tour: Review-E.L. Farris’s I Run

Blog Tour: Review-E.L. Farris’s I Run

E.L. Farris’ I Run is an emotional journey as one woman tries to outrun her personal demons from the past and raise a family. As far as characterization, we have good character development. Sally is our main character and she’s married and a mother to three children. She’s been struggling since the accident and it’s easy to like her. There’s some personal trauma that she’s been trying to remember and yet can’t. Then we have her husband William who at times comes off as passive and I’m still trying to wrap my mind around him and what he thinks of Sally. We have a variety of secondary characters who play a vital role including Sally’s mother who is a first grade bitch. Then we have Sally’s friend Beth who has… Read more »

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Nov 04
Book Review: Diane Setterfield’s Bellman & Black

Book Review: Diane Setterfield’s Bellman & Black

Imagine for a moment that a childhood incident defines rest of your life. How would you react? Diane Setterfield’s Bellman & Black is an eerie, macabre tale that will leave you looking at life and death a little differently. As children, we’ve all done stupid things and ten year old William Bellman is no different. Hanging out with friends, they see a rook and dare him to use a slingshot on it. Thinking he’ll miss, he’s surprised when doesn’t, and the outcome weighs heavily on him. He suppresses the memory and grows up to become a successful entrepreneur. Several years later, an illness sweeps through the town and everyone begins to die. Desperate to save his family William makes a pact with the unknown Mr. Black. He spends the rest… Read more »

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Jul 11
Book Review: Elizabeth L. Silver’s The Execution of Noa P Singleton

Book Review: Elizabeth L. Silver’s The Execution of Noa P Singleton

Regardless of which side you’re on concerning the issue of the death penalty, Elizabeth L. Silver’s The Execution of Noa P. Singleton is a thought provoking debut. Six months before her execution, Noa P Singleton receives an unexpected visit. The mother of her victim, Marlene Dixon, informs her she’s had a change of heart and doesn’t believe in capital punishment. Working with her associate, Oliver Stansted, she creates an organization, MAD (Mothers Against Death), but Noa doesn’t want anything to do with Marlene or her organization. Oliver works tirelessly on Noa’s behalf, but Noa doesn’t talk. As the countdown begins to her execution, we’re left with questions regarding Noa’s version of events. Will Noa be granted clemency or will she be tied to her fate? Narrative is first person and… Read more »

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May 22
Blog Tour: Review-Tanya J. Peterson’s Leave of Absence

Blog Tour: Review-Tanya J. Peterson’s Leave of Absence

What is normal? That’s one of the questions Tanya J. Peterson has us asking while we read Leave of Absence. It’s an engaging, heartbreaking read and if you only read one book this year, it HAS to be Leave of Absence. You won’t regret it and you’ll see the world a little differently. Peterson has done a phenomenal job writing about a taboo subject. In a world filled with science and understanding, you’d think we’d be more open to talking about mental health, but we shy away from it. Oliver Graham lost his wife and son in a terrible accident and blames himself for their deaths. Wanting to numb the terrible pain he attempts to commit suicide, but when his attempt is thwarted he’s taken to Airheaven Behavioral Center. There… Read more »

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May 21
Book Review: Ania Szado’s Studio Saint-Ex

Book Review: Ania Szado’s Studio Saint-Ex

I’m terrified to review Ania Szado’s Studio Saint-Ex because I feel my review can’t do justice to the beautiful story Szado wrote. I planned on reading Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince before Studio so I could get into the mindset and get reacquainted with the beloved children’s book; however, I read the first two few chapters and put it aside, deciding to delve into Studio Saint-Ex with only my memory of The Little Prince. Szado’s Studio Saint-Ex is a fictionalized biography of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s time in New York. It’s 1943 and Antoine is anxious to join the war effort. While he awaits the news of America’s involvement in the Second World War, he is reacquainted with his old English tutor, Mignonne Lachapelle. Mignonne is back in New York,… Read more »

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May 01
Book Review: Peggy Riley’s Amity & Sorrow

Book Review: Peggy Riley’s Amity & Sorrow

Once in a while, there’s a book that comes your way and it just falls into your lap. Amity & Sorrow is a book that came my way by accident. I received notification that I was pre-approved for a few titles from Little Brown and Company and decided to check them out. I devoured Peggy Riley’s book and it’s a powerful debut. Amaranth and her daughters are on the run and by the fourth day, exhausted due to lack of sleep, Amaranth crashes into a tree. She finds a gas station and pleads for help, but the farmer, Bradley, in charge of the station tells her he can’t. He insists she needs to call her husband for help, but she refuses. Taking shelter under his porch, Amaranth and her daughters… Read more »

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Mar 11
Book Review: Margot Berwin’s Scent of Darkness

Book Review: Margot Berwin’s Scent of Darkness

A few weeks ago, I read a short review in Entertainment Weekly for Margot Berwin’s Scent of Darkness. It sounded intriguing and when I found out my local library had a copy, I quickly requested a hold. I can’t describe how I feel about Scent of Darkness because I just don’t know what to say. Berwin’s Scent of Darkness is a coming of age story. Eva grew up with a mother who resented her because she was the product of a one night stand. Being Catholic, her mother didn’t get an abortion and made it her mission to spend little time with Eva. Eva was raised her by grandmother, Louise who is a perfume maker and teaches her about how scents play a central role in our lives. When Louise… Read more »

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