Posts Tagged: thriller

Feb 20
Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s The Guns of Ridgewood: A Western of Modern America

Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s The Guns of Ridgewood: A Western of Modern America

Aaron Cooley’s The Guns of Ridgewood is a thought provoking new thriller and if you’ve never read any of his previous novels, you don’t know what you’re missing! Cooley is a favorite of mine and you’ll see why. We have really good characterization. Sour Manco is a broken man and I wasn’t sure what to make of him. I really enjoyed getting to know him and finding out about his past. You’ll easily root for him and while I hope we’ll see more of Sour in future books, I think he’s done telling his own story. We have a wide array of secondary characters that play a role including Jill, a former Army Ranger and a Congressman, Homer Blunt. Then we have our Congressional Killers, a trio of men who… Read more »

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Jun 24
Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Four Seats

Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Four Seats

I really enjoyed Aaron Cooley’s Shaken Not Stirred and when he asked if I’d be interested in reviewing part one of Four Seats, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity! If what I’ve read so far is any indication of what the rest of the book will be, then you’re in for a real treat! Four Seats will truly be one of your favorite summer reads and can’t be missed! We have a lot of characters who are vital to the narrative and Cooley doesn’t sacrifice character development. Our hero is Jason Lancaster and he’s also the government’s prime suspect. Lancaster’s resume is pretty impressive and I won’t go into detail, but it’s easy to understand why he’s on their radar. Known to be punctual, Lancaster is employed through the Supreme… Read more »

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Aug 19
Book Review: Chelsea Cain’s One Kick + Giveaway

Book Review: Chelsea Cain’s One Kick + Giveaway

I’ve made no secret of my love for Chelsea Cain and her Archie & Gretchen series. When I heard she was going to put Archie & Gretchen to the side to focus on a new series, I admit, I was heartbroken. No Archie and the gang for another year or two? Ack, my heart couldn’t take it! At first, I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read One Kick, but hey, if I love Cain’s writing then she couldn’t disappoint. Right? As far as characterization, it’s a bit weak but keep in mind this is a series and no doubt the main characters will be fleshed out as it continues. Kathleen “Kit” Lannigan was kidnapped as a child and her rescue made headlines. She’s an unlikely heroine in that she… Read more »

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Aug 12
Interview: Wendy Corsi Staub

Interview: Wendy Corsi Staub

I’m thrilled to welcome Wendy Corsi Staub to Lit, etc! I enjoyed Wendy’s newest release The Perfect Stranger and today she’s here to talk a little about her writing process and her new release. Q. Tell me something about Wendy Corsi Staub other than the standard bio on your website. After my husband and I lost both our moms and his aunt to breast cancer and one of our best friends died suddenly, we realized life is too short to put off the bucket list for retirement years. So we set out on an ongoing 50 state book tour with our sons, hoping to complete it before our firstborn graduated high school. When he did last year, we were only short three. We crossed off another state this summer as… Read more »

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Jul 28
Book Review: Wendy Corsi Staub’s The Perfect Stranger

Book Review: Wendy Corsi Staub’s The Perfect Stranger

I’ve always wanted to read Wendy Corsi Staub’s books and when the opportunity came to review her upcoming release, The Perfect Stranger, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity! After reading The Perfect Stranger, you look at the internet a little differently. As for characterization, we have a several characters that play a vital role. Just a quick note: if you’re the type that needs to focus on two or three characters in order to fully follow a story, you might want to proceed with caution since the amount of characters Staub introduces might overwhelm you. Take your time reading the first couple of chapters in order to get acquainted with everyone. Now, I’d say Landry is the most important character since she’s the one who initiates contact regarding attending Meredith’s… Read more »

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Oct 03
Blog Tour: Review-Harry Hallman’s Word

Blog Tour: Review-Harry Hallman’s Word

Short stories are difficult to review without going into extensive detail and revealing the plot. Martin is doing great and has everything he could hope for. He’s a big fan of playing games and doesn’t think twice accepting an invite to play a game version similar to Scrabble with a stranger. When VN76 begins to play, Martin is smug and knows he can easily beat them. The next day he goes about his normal business until he begins having one of those days. You know the type, where one thing goes wrong and suddenly everything goes downhill. When his dog goes missing, he goes home only to realize there’s more to VN76’s word play and begins to frantically find out their identity before it is too late. Overall, I liked… Read more »

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Aug 22
Book Review: Chelsea Cain’s Let Me Go

Book Review: Chelsea Cain’s Let Me Go

Chelsea Cain’s Let Me Go is the sixth book in her Archie Sheridan / Gretchen Lowell series. If you haven’t read the series, start with Heartsick and work your way down. For a standalone, read The Night Season. Let Me Go is not a standalone and Cain mentions a few cases and people from the other books, hence the reason I recommend starting with Heartsick. Let Me Go picks up shortly after Kill You Twice leaves off. Gretchen is still at large and for once Archie takes things in stride. When Archie receives some unsettling news, he sets out to meet with Leo Reynolds, son of drug lord Jack Reynolds and a secret DEA agent. Soon Archie finds out Jack is the one pulling the strings and Leo is being… Read more »

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Jul 15
Book Review: Marisha Pessl’s Night Film

Book Review: Marisha Pessl’s Night Film

Without a doubt Marisha Pessl’s Night Film is probably going down as my favorite read of the year. It is also the most difficult book I have yet to review. There’s so much I want to discuss and analyze, but I can’t without giving spoilers and I feel that no review can live up to how amazing Night Film is. Scott McGrath, a former investigative journalist, is surprised to hear of Ashley Cordova’s death. Ashley was a young and brilliant pianist whose father is Stanislas Cordova, a notorious filmmaker. Cordova has always been a shadowy figure and goes at great lengths to hide what he looks like. Only one known photograph exists and that’s in a 1977 issue of Rolling Stone. Scott has plenty of reasons to dislike Cordova; after… Read more »

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Apr 10
Book Review: Digger Cartwright’s The House of Dark Shadows

Book Review: Digger Cartwright’s The House of Dark Shadows

I’m a big fan of psychological thrillers because nothing turns out the way you thought it would. Digger Cartwright does a phenomenal job with The House of Dark Shadows. I thought I had everything figured out due to the clues he gave us along the way, but I was blown off course. The ending isn’t exactly what you expect nor is it your typical Hollywood ending, but it fits. Alex Rommel has everything a bachelor could ask for. He’s successful at his job and quite the ladies man, but he’s missing the love of his life. Years ago Shannon left him and he’s been haunted with memories of her and desperately searches for her. He runs into an old university friend, Brad, at a café and Brad mentions how he’s… Read more »

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Apr 01
Guest Post: The Destruction Of Innocence by Rebecca Reid

Guest Post: The Destruction Of Innocence by Rebecca Reid

I’m really excited about today’s very special guest! Today we have author Rebecca Reid and her psychological thriller, The Coop, is one of the best books I read in 2012. If you’re interested in knowing more about her, feel free to read her interview. The Destruction Of Innocence This may not come as a shock to you, but writing is so much more than hitting a few keys on your computer. It is so much more than creation. It is alive. To me at least, I can speak for no other authors when I say that. There is no plot line, no pre-planned chapters, just a cold cup of tea and burning fingers. I settle to write and it becomes me. The destination of my journey is unknown, as are… Read more »

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Mar 24
Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred

Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred

Imagine for a moment Ian Fleming writing the opening scene of his first James Bond novel, Casino Royale. Do you ever wonder where he got the inspiration for the world’s most famous spy? Several candidates have been named, but in Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred, the spy who helps a young Fleming is none other than Dušan Popov. Names are changed, Popov becomes Dusan Petrović and Fleming is Ioan Phlegm. Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred is a fictionalized account of Ian Fleming’s wartime work, but it’s easy to imagine it really happening. In Shaken, Not Stirred, a young Ioan is working for the Naval Intelligence and he’s sent to the Congo to find and report back to MI6 the whereabouts of double agent Dusan Petrović. His naiveté is apparent and he… Read more »

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Feb 17
Spotlight: Author Rebecca Reid

Spotlight: Author Rebecca Reid

Synopsis: Enter The Coop, a dark and misleading psychological thriller about the destruction of innocence. A girl, apparently imprisoned in a room, is the thread of mystery running parallel to the tale of Thatchbury village. Meet Howard and Lilly. They take you on a journey through Thatchbury where Mathew, the child from the coop, shoots Jodie Tiding, and so unravels the history of his loveless raising, her innocence and the dramatic events leading them to disaster. The Coop is a darkly compelling vision of the layers of consciousness. Although conceived as the first novel in a trilogy, The Coop stands alone as a brilliant individual work of fiction About Rebecca Rebecca Reid was withdrawn from school due to illness at fourteen. Being limited in the things she was able to… Read more »

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