Posts Tagged: victorian

Jan 19
Book Review: Tasha Alexander’s And Only to Deceive

Book Review: Tasha Alexander’s And Only to Deceive

Tasha Alexander’s Lady Emily series has been on my radar for a few years and I finally decided to give the first book, And Only to Deceive, a read because I love the synopsis to the ninth book, The Counterfeit Heiress. I wasn’t sure if this is one of those series where you have to read the first in order to understand or enjoy the rest of the books and therefore decided to start at the beginning. We have good character development. Our main heroine is Emily, Lady Ashton who is a young widow. She’s your typical Victorian woman and struggles to break free from society rules and one way she does this, is to marry Viscount Ashton. Throughout the novel, we see her transformation with Emily developing her own… Read more »

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Nov 21
Blog Tour: Review-Victoria Alexander’s The Shocking Secret of a Guest at the Wedding + Giveaway

Blog Tour: Review-Victoria Alexander’s The Shocking Secret of a Guest at the Wedding + Giveaway

I’ve read a few of Victoria Alexander’s books in the past and I’m always annoyed with myself for not keeping up with her. She’s definitely an author I’ve enjoyed and when the opportunity came to take part in the blog tour for The Shocking Secret of a Guest at the Wedding I knew I couldn’t pass up the chance. Even though it’s the fourth book in the series you can easily pick this up and is very much a standalone novel. We have really good character development and have a wide array of characters that play a vital role. Our main characters are Jackson Quincy Graham Channing and Lady Theodosia “Teddy” Winslow. I adored Jackson! I felt bad for his upbringing in terms of a shocking secret which I won’t… Read more »

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Jul 31
Book Review: Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry

Book Review: Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry

Will Thomas’ Fatal Enquiry is the sixth book in his Baker and Llewlyn series. If you haven’t read any of the books in the series, it’s not necessary to do so in order to enjoy Fatal Enquiry. Thomas does a good job minimizing history from other books and at no point do you feel lost reading a book in an already established series. We have good character development. Cyrus Baker is a gentleman enquiry agent and he’s a bit quirky. We don’t get to fully know him, but it’s easy to see that he’s not an easy man to work for. His assistant is Thomas Llewlyn who was once in jail for a crime and now devotes his time assisting Baker on cases. I had trouble with Llewlyn and wasn’t… Read more »

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Dec 05
25 Days of Book Boyfriends: Nicholas Brisbane + Giveaway

25 Days of Book Boyfriends: Nicholas Brisbane + Giveaway

Yay! I’m really excited to be part of the 25 Days of Book Boyfriends hosted by Lovin’ los libros, Readers Live a 1000 Lives, and Starbucks & Books Obsession. As several of you know, I have way too many fictional boyfriends and today I’m going to share with you someone I met over the summer. See, I’d seen him mentioned a few times, but I didn’t have the courage to meet him until I was called for jury duty. I complained and when I found out you could spend your free time in the waiting room doing what you wanted, I knew what I was going to do: I was going to finally crack open the first book in the Lady Julia Grey series. I was memorized from the moment… Read more »

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Oct 21
Book Review: Charles Finch’s An Old Betrayal + Giveaway

Book Review: Charles Finch’s An Old Betrayal + Giveaway

It’s always a treat to settle down with a Charles Finch novel and An Old Betrayal doesn’t disappoint. An Old Betrayal is the seventh book in the Charles Lenox series and if you haven’t read the series, you can delve right in since most books can be read as a standalone. Finch isn’t one to drown the reader in a character’s back story and therefore I do recommend you start from the beginning with A Beautiful Blue Death, but it’s not necessary. Set in 1875, An Old Betrayal picks up a year after A Death in the Small Hours ends. Former gentleman detective turned Member of Parliament, Charles Lenox, finds himself busy in the House of Commons and as Junior Lord of the Treasury. When the opportunity arises to assist… Read more »

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Oct 05
One Liners: Charles Finch’s A Beautiful Blue Death

One Liners: Charles Finch’s A Beautiful Blue Death

One Liners is a weekly feature where we look at a novel’s first line as if it were a pick up line. We’ve all heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” The first line in a book is equally important as the last since it sets the tone and often will either make an impression or not. Let’s face it, it’s a little like dating. Will that guy with the cheesy pick up line score a number or not? So, I began to think…if the first line in a book was a pick up line, would you give it your number, agree to a date, let it buy you a drink, or do you walk away? Today’s book is Charles Finch’s A Beautiful… Read more »

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Sep 14
One Liners: Deanna Raybourn’s Silent in the Grave

One Liners: Deanna Raybourn’s Silent in the Grave

One Liners is a weekly feature where we look at a novel’s first line as if it were a pick up line. We’ve all heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” The first line in a book is equally important as the last since it sets the tone and often will either make an impression or not. Let’s face it, it’s a little like dating. Will that guy with the cheesy pick up line score a number or not? So, I began to think…if the first line in a book was a pick up line, would you give it your number, agree to a date, let it buy you a drink, or do you walk away? The first book to be featured is… Read more »

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Apr 15
Book Review: Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman

Book Review: Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman

I’m a fan of Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz) and auto-buy her books. I admit I lost interest in her Arcane series once we reached the conclusion of how Jones & Jones agency came together and she started expanding the Arcane series to include outside associates. I wanted to prep for this review by reading the last 3 books I missed, but decided it would be best to read from a new reader’s perspective without any previous knowledge as most new readers. Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman is the second book in her Ladies of Lantern Street series. If you haven’t read the first book, Crystal Gardens, it’s not necessary to do so. Quick does a good job giving you an overview of what exactly the agency Flint &… Read more »

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Feb 18
Book Review: Dara England’s Death on Dartmoor

Book Review: Dara England’s Death on Dartmoor

When American Heiress, Millicent Wright, travels to Devonshire, England to become better acquainted with Sir Oliver Longbourne, she has no idea she’ll be the heroine at the center of her own gothic novel. Her mother, on the other hand, wants Millicent married and who better than an English titled husband? Millicent is reluctant because she knows there’s only one reason why Longbourne would want to marry her: she’s an heiress and it’s apparent he needs the money. In the late 19th century, cash strapped English aristocrats married American heiresses, who were part of the nouveau riche, in exchange for a title that would earn them a place in high society. Millicent is aware of Longbourne’s interest as well as everyone present at Buckfast Hall, Longbourne’s estate. When Longbourne is murdered… Read more »

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Jan 19
Book Review: Vicki Hopkins’ Dark Persuasion

Book Review: Vicki Hopkins’ Dark Persuasion

I’ve stated before in a previous review how I’m not a big fan of authors who are upfront and state the history of central characters and how they are connected. This approach can be either hit or miss, but in the case of Dark Persuasion, Vicki Hopkins does an amazing job setting up the plot and it defiantly is needed to understand the particular actions of certain characters. Charlotte Grey was a child when an accident left her blind and she’s surprised her aristocratic neighbors are interested in being her sponsors and hold a ball in her honor. At the ball she meets two brothers, Patrick and Rupert, who are different as night and day. Both will battle for her hand, but which brother will win her heart and can… Read more »

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Jan 09

Favorite Victorian Era Novels

These are a few of my favorite Victorian era novels. All the novels listed were published during the period from 1837-1901. It’s not a complete list, but these I love to reread. What are your favorites? Title:Vanity Fair Author: William Makepeace Thackeray Year: 1847 A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847–48, satirizing society in early 19th-century Britain. The book’s title comes from John Bunyan’s allegorical story The Pilgrim’s Progress, first published in 1678 and still widely read at the time of Thackeray’s novel. Vanity fair refers to a stop along the pilgrim’s progress: a never-ending fair held in a town called Vanity, which is meant to represent man’s sinful attachment to worldly things. Title: Anna Karenina Author: Leo Tolstoy Year: 1877… Read more »

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Nov 20
Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

A Death in the Small Hours is the sixth installment of the Lenox mystery series and his best one to date. If you’ve never read the Lenox series, don’t fret as each of his books can be read as a standalone. Although Finch isn’t one of those writers to drown you in a character’s back story, I do believe a reader new to the series will fail to appreciate the personal history of his characters. As the series progresses, the Lenox characters grow and I’m afraid a reader will miss key elements that would help further understand a character’s way of thinking or reaction to a situation. Therefore, I do recommend you start at the beginning with A Beautiful Blue Death and work your down the list, but it’s not… Read more »

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