Source: Complimentary Copy won via Publisher

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Mar 03
Book Review: Lauren Layne’s After the Kiss

Book Review: Lauren Layne’s After the Kiss

If you’ve seen How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days, then you know the plot quite well. As I read Lauren Layne’s After the Kiss, thoughts of Andie and Ben came to mind. If you’re not familiar with the film, basically Andie works for a magazine (think Cosmo) and decides to write a story, how a girl can lose a guy and showcases the tips of where she went wrong. On the other side is Ben who makes a bet that he can make a woman fall in love with him and if he wins, he gets a lucrative contract. Well…let’s just say Andie and Ben come together and both don’t know they are using each other. Layne’s After the Kiss is very similar to the film, but in… Read more »

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Jul 09
Book Review: Stephanie Evanovich’s Big Girl Panties

Book Review: Stephanie Evanovich’s Big Girl Panties

If Stephanie Evanovich’s name sounds familiar it is because she’s the niece of Janet Evanovich. I wanted to love Big Girl Panties based on the synopsis, but it just fell flat. Logan has a habit of calling his female clients swans. Meaning he transforms them from ugly ducklings to beautiful swans and he’s quite confident in his ability. While I respect he’s a personal trainer and one to the rich and famous, he comes off as shallow and immature. Holly, on the other hand, is still grieving for her husband. She admits to self esteem issues and at times while I could relate to her, there were times I couldn’t stand her. Her constant comparison of her life versus her childhood friend’s life was annoying especially for a woman who… Read more »

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Mar 24
Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred

Book Review: Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred

Imagine for a moment Ian Fleming writing the opening scene of his first James Bond novel, Casino Royale. Do you ever wonder where he got the inspiration for the world’s most famous spy? Several candidates have been named, but in Aaron Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred, the spy who helps a young Fleming is none other than Dušan Popov. Names are changed, Popov becomes Dusan Petrović and Fleming is Ioan Phlegm. Cooley’s Shaken, Not Stirred is a fictionalized account of Ian Fleming’s wartime work, but it’s easy to imagine it really happening. In Shaken, Not Stirred, a young Ioan is working for the Naval Intelligence and he’s sent to the Congo to find and report back to MI6 the whereabouts of double agent Dusan Petrović. His naiveté is apparent and he… Read more »

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