Posts Tagged: book review

Jan 18
Book Review: Mark Capell’s Vows to Kill

Book Review: Mark Capell’s Vows to Kill

When Detective Inspector Lee Eyre receives an email threatening to kill him on his wedding day, he is on the hunt to find the culprit. At first he believes it might an interoffice joke, but then he quickly realizes if it’s not a joke, who sent it? Should he tell his wife-to-be, Lucy, or keep quiet as he investigates? There’s one question we, as readers, will find ourselves asking: Is Lee Eyre guilty? There’s mention of an incident gone wrong and Eyre’s inability to move on from it. Mark Capell does an excellent job going over the details of “Southampton” (the place where the incident occurs). If Eyre is guilty, what is he guilty of? What I really enjoyed is how Capell reveals bits of information and it’s up to… Read more »

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Jan 17
Book Review: Shelly Crane’s Significance

Book Review: Shelly Crane’s Significance

Significance is the first book in Shelly Crane’s Significance series. There are four books total with a companion book. In this case, it is necessary to read the first book in the series and work your way down the list. I should also note there’s a film version of the series coming to a screen near you. Ultimately what doesn’t work for me is how quickly Maggie and Caleb fall in love. Maggie even questioned her constant need for him and Caleb himself said to her that he wouldn’t push himself on her. He doesn’t, and I realize situations forced them be in each other’s company, but it wasn’t believable to me. Also the whole imprint concept was a bit rushed and not thoroughly explained. I don’t know if it’s… Read more »

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Jan 13
Book Review: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl

Book Review: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl

Gone Girl has been sitting in my to be read pile for awhile now and even though I’m late to the party, I have finally arrived. I’ve never read Gillian Flynn before and even though I’ve seen her books around, nothing really prompted me to read anything of hers before. I kept seeing people rave about her latest and I finally decided to see for myself. I can’t believe I waited this long. What I can say about Gone Girl without spoiling it? Nick Dunne isn’t going to win the husband of the year award and when his wife, Amy, goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary, questions soon arise about his true character. Nick himself is hiding a few secrets and he maintains his innocence regarding his… Read more »

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Dec 05
Book Review: Charlotte Abel’s Enchantment

Book Review: Charlotte Abel’s Enchantment

Enchantment is first book in the Channie series and currently there is a sequel (Taken) and a prequel (part of a YA anthology, Midnight Surrender). It’s not necessary to read the prequel before Enchantment since it was written after the first book. Channie Kearns isn’t your typical sixteen year old girl and she’s use to living in seclusion. When the family is forced to flee the Ozark Mountains, they move to Colorado where they must hide the fact they are witches. What ensues is a journey about a young teenage girl falling in love and finding herself. Imagine for a moment having a name and it’s tied to your personality. You’re probably asking yourself, how can a name be tied to a personality? Let’s say your name is Charity, you… Read more »

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Nov 20
Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

Book Review: Charles Finch’s A Death in the Small Hours

A Death in the Small Hours is the sixth installment of the Lenox mystery series and his best one to date. If you’ve never read the Lenox series, don’t fret as each of his books can be read as a standalone. Although Finch isn’t one of those writers to drown you in a character’s back story, I do believe a reader new to the series will fail to appreciate the personal history of his characters. As the series progresses, the Lenox characters grow and I’m afraid a reader will miss key elements that would help further understand a character’s way of thinking or reaction to a situation. Therefore, I do recommend you start at the beginning with A Beautiful Blue Death and work your down the list, but it’s not… Read more »

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Nov 12
Book Review: G. Brailey’s Deathloop

Book Review: G. Brailey’s Deathloop

G. Brailey’s debut novel can be described in one word: brilliant. Deathloop captivates and through a series of twists and turns, it will keep you on the edge of your seat. Zack Fortune is successful, charismatic, and gorgeous. He’s also a bastard of the first order and makes no apologies for it. In fact, he’s the first to agree that he’s one. Sam, his best friend, once said he was a romantic bastard. You know the type, will wine and dine you and in many ways romance you the old fashioned way, then out of nowhere dump you. One night Zack reluctantly agrees to participate in a past life regression and is given clear instructions “no matter what you see do not come out.” His regression is terrifying and nothing… Read more »

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Nov 02
Book Review: Sophie Morgan’s Diary of a Submissive

Book Review: Sophie Morgan’s Diary of a Submissive

Sophie Morgan’s book opens up with a prologue that many of us no doubt have witnessed before. A man and a woman are outside; the man tugs on her hair forcibly and we hear him call her a slut and whore. We look into her eyes and see fury behind them as she restrains herself and the man’s hand tangles tighter into her hair as we, the outsider watch. Immediately our thoughts range from calling for help to intervening, but as Morgan describes the scene, it plays out as that of a D/s (Dominance and submission) relationship. It’s an uncomfortable read as you realize what she describes could be any couple located anywhere, but at the same time she plays it off as part of the lifestyle. We the reader/outsider… Read more »

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Oct 30
Book Review: Courtney Cole’s Confessions of an Alli Cat

Book Review: Courtney Cole’s Confessions of an Alli Cat

I’ve never read Courtney Cole before, and it’s my understanding she writes mostly Young Adult. Confessions of an Alli Cat is her first “adult” contemporary. I had high hopes for Confessions because the synopsis looked interesting, and it sounded like a funny read. Thirty-five-year-old Allison Lancaster is divorced and in a dating funk. Well, actually not a funk as she’s not dating anyone. Her best friend Sara buys her a night with a gigolo, and encourages to her to try new things such as sex toys and a Brazilian. What ensues is supposed to be a hilarious account of a woman getting her groove back; however, the book falls flat for me. While it’s a fast-paced read, I had several issues with the plot and its execution. First of all,… Read more »

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Oct 25
Book Review: Sylvia Day’s Reflected In You

Book Review: Sylvia Day’s Reflected In You

Reflected In You is the highly anticipated sequel to Sylvia Day’s Bared To You. It is part of a trilogy and book two in the Crossfire series. It can be read as a standalone, if you’re the type not to care for much back story, and if you aren’t interested to see how the series concludes. The Crossfire series will get compared to Fifty Shades of Grey, but I disagree. I believe both series are very different from each other (there is no BDSM references here ) and can be enjoyed by fans of both. This next installment picks up right where we left off at the end of Bared To You. It’s the morning after Cary’s, Eva’s roommate, infamous orgy in the middle of their living room- what a… Read more »

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Oct 16
Book Review: Carol Oates’ Iridescent

Book Review: Carol Oates’ Iridescent

Iridescent is the second book in the Ember series and is not a standalone book. Carol Oates touches upon history featured in Ember, and all of the characters return in Iridescent. I tried to imagine coming into Iridescent without having read Ember; and honestly, I don’t believe it can be done. You, dear reader, would be scrambling trying to make sense of the world created by Oates and everyone’s relationship; therefore, I highly suggest reading Ember first for the back story. Iridescent picks up right where Ember left off; Candra is still recovering from the death of her best friend, Ivy, while having to deal with saving the world. Late one night, she comes face to face with Lilith, a soul carrier. Lilith tricks Candra into thinking she’s Ivy, and… Read more »

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Oct 11
Book Review: Jolene Stockman’s The Jellybean Crisis

Book Review: Jolene Stockman’s The Jellybean Crisis

I should point out that I normally don’t read young adult fiction. It’s just not a genre that totally grasps my interest; however, I will admit to wanting to read Jolene Stockman’s The Jellybean Crisis based on the cover alone. I mean, look at it! It’s gorgeous! In the end Stockman’s writing had me riveted. It’s a fun story, and I believe in the message in the book: You aren’t limited to just being you, you can be many things, but most importantly don’t forget about YOU. Poppy Johnson is a 16-year-old who does everything that is expected of her. Along the way, she loses the most important aspect–herself. She has a plan: attend Columbia, major in finance, and then work on Wall Street. She has a blueprint (yes, Stockman… Read more »

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Oct 11
Book Review: Jolene Stockman’s Total Blueprint for World Domination

Book Review: Jolene Stockman’s Total Blueprint for World Domination

We’ve all heard of The Secret or books like it and while the synopsis of Total Blueprint points in that direction it’s not. Sure some elements of it may mimic Rhonda Byrne or Esther Hicks, but in the end Total Blueprint is just that…a blueprint on how to make your dreams come true. It’s targeted towards young adults, however; both parents and their children can sit down and map out a future of possibilities. We all have dreams we would like to see to fruition so why not create a blueprint? As Stockman states, “You’ve got one life, one shot, and all the power to make it happen. Get ready to dream big and live big. It’s all up to you. And it starts now.” Stockman’s writing is simple and… Read more »

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